Birmingham Law Society Race to the Commonwealth and Beyond Conference & Dinner

    proudly presents      

Co-hosted by:           

Date: Thursday 21st & Friday 22nd July

Time: Day 1 Conference 8am - 5.30pm | Dinner 7pm - 11pm | Day 2 Conference 8am - 4.15pm

Venue: University of Birmingham, Edgbaston Campus, Birmingham

The conference will be held in the Teaching and Learning Centre. The dinner will be in the Great Hall

Price: Two Day Conference and Dinner £310.00 | Two Day Conference £200.00 | Dinner £110.00

Booking Link



Day 1 – Race to the Commonwealth and Beyond

Day one will commence by addressing the law in sport, exploring its place in the modern game. After a mid-morning break, the main session will cover child abuse and exploitation, and how sports clubs prevent the sexual abuse and exploitation of children. Alternatively, a breakout session will discuss access to data, and how sportsmen and women can be protected against the unsolicited use of their images.

The afternoon will start with the Race to the Commonwealth & Beyond, exploring race and what it means to the Commonwealth. Following a break, discussions turn to sports events and privacy issues with the question of has the pandemic changed our approach to the privacy of medical data?

Day one will end with a dinner, hosted in the historic and prestigious Great Hall at the University of Birmingham. The evening is set to be a night of entertainment and fundraising for our charity partner, It’s a Penalty.

Day 2 – Creating a Level Playing Field

Day two leads with international arbitration and mediation - inside and out of the world of sport, which poses the question as to why arbitration and mediation have become such popular mechanisms for resolving disputes. The morning is then divided into two sessions, the main session covering gender equality and its legal and policy challenges and a breakout session that discusses sports contracts thinking about what is fair and for whose benefit.

The final topic of the conference will be ethics and conduct in sporting regulation considering how far should the law go in regulating the ethics of sport.



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